Are African Americans Open To Interventions For Their Love Ones

Are African Americans Open To Interventions For Their Love Ones

As an African American, I’ve often asked myself if we as a people believe in interventions for our love ones? Maybe we are afraid to confront our love ones? Do we fully understand the intervention process.  Are we doubting the effectiveness of interventions?

I have witnessed more than a few times how family members and sometimes friends can disrupt a loving home with drugs, stress, violence etc.  I ‘ve had friends that enabled their brother, aunt or sister without reaching out to the community for rehabilitation programs. In all honesty, we tend to do everything except the right thing for our love ones.

Recently a friend told me their brother was homeless and on meth, the brother moved in with my friend. One day my friend’s daughter called and I overheard my friend talking to his daughter. I realized his daughter was not happy, he asked her what’s wrong. Based on my friend’s response, her daughter felt uncomfortable being in the home alone with her uncle currently high on meth. I asked my friend is everything ok. He said my daughter was kind of uneasy but she is fine.

I badly wanted to give advice to my friend, now thinking back, maybe I should’ve. I would’ve suggested that his living conditions may not be the best for his daughter and maybe he should seek arraignments to move his brother out of the home and also suggest that he seek treatment. As I explained earlier, in my past experiences we as black people seem to enable our loved ones instead of helping them. The thought of asking a friend or love one to consider treatment for their drug problem is not something we pursue.

We should always consider our children and the type of environment we are exposing them to. This can put a huge burden on children, It’s unfair and they really don’t deserve it.

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